Posted in Biography, Graphic Novels, LGBTQ, Manga, Realistic Fiction, Sports, Travel

July: Fiction, Graphic Novels, and an Olympic Soccer Player

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93891  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/94013  https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51I%2BW9eOcML.jpg  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93951  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93998  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93970

Breakaway: Beyond the Goal, by Alex Morgan. Summary: As a talented and successful female athlete, Alex Morgan is a role model to thousands of girls who want to be their best, not just in soccer, but in life. The story of her path to success—from playing in the 2011 Women’s World Cup, to winning gold in the 2012 London Olympics, to ranking as one of the National Team’s top scorers—will inspire everyone who reads it.

From her beginnings with the American Youth Soccer Organization to the role she played in winning the 2015 Women’s World Cup, Alex shares the details that made her who she is today: a fantastic role model and athlete who proudly rocks a pink headband.

The Worry Workbook for Teens: Effective CBT Strategies to Break the Cycle of Chronic Worry & Anxiety, by Jamie A. Micco, PhD. Summary: Teens often worry about school, friends, dating, and what the future holds. But chronic worrying can take a toll both mentally and physically—leading to insomnia, difficulty paying attention, and even headaches and stomachaches. Written by a Harvard faculty member and expert in teen anxiety, this is the first book to target chronic, debilitating worry in teens, and offers effective, easy-to-understand cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) exercises to alleviate worry symptoms and prevent them from escalating into full-blown generalized anxiety disorder.

Wandering Son, vols. 6 & 7, by Shimura Takako. Summary of Series: Shuichi, a boy who wants to be a girl, and Yoshino, a girl who wants to be a boy, become friends in junior high school, where they tackle problems such as gender identity, love, social acceptance, and puberty.

On the Camino, by Jason. Summary: Northwestern Spain, observed with the eye of an artist, chronicling both the good (people, conversations) and the bad (blisters, bedbugs) he encountered on his journey. Full of quiet incidents, odd encounters, small triumphs, and the occasional setback, On the Camino is the first implicitly autobiographical long-form work by a master cartoonist.

The Refrigerator Monologues, by Catherynne M. Valente. Summary: From the New York Times bestselling author Catherynne Valente comes a series of linked stories from the points of view of the wives and girlfriends of superheroes, female heroes, and anyone who’s ever been “refrigerated”: comic book women who are killed, raped, brainwashed, driven mad, disabled, or had their powers taken so that a male superhero’s storyline will progress. In an entirely new and original superhero universe, Valente explores these ideas and themes in the superhero genre, treating them with the same love, gravity, and humor as her fairy tales. After all, superheroes are our new fairy tales and these six women have their own stories to share.

The Unlikelies, by Carrie Firestone. Summary: Rising high school senior Sadie is bracing herself for a long, lonely, and boring summer. But things take an unexpected turn when she steps in to help rescue a baby in distress and a video of her good deed goes viral.

Suddenly internet-famous, Sadie’s summer changes for the better when she’s introduced to other “hometown heroes.” These five very different teens form an unlikely alliance to secretly right local wrongs, but when they try to help a heroin-using friend, they get in over their heads and discover that there might be truth in the saying “no good deed goes unpunished.” Can Sadie and her new friends make it through the summer with their friendships–and anonymity–intact?

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Biography, Fiction, Historical Fiction, LGBTQ, New, Non-Fiction, Realistic Fiction, Romance, Teens

New Titles for May! Part II

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93210    http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93207http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93233  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93200

The Dead Inside: A True Story, by Cyndy Etler.

Cyndy Etler’s gripping memoir gives readers a glimpse into the harrowing reality of her sixteen months in the notorious “tough love” program the ACLU called “a concentration camp for throwaway kids.”

“I never was a bada$$. Or a slut, a junkie, a stoner, like they told me I was. I was just a kid looking for something good, something that felt like love. I was a wannabe in a Levi’s jean jacket. Anybody could see that. Except my mother. And the professionals at Straight. From the outside, Straight Inc. was a drug rehab. But on the inside it was…well, it was something else.”

All Cyndy wanted was to be loved and accepted. By age fourteen, she had escaped from her violent home, only to be reported as a runaway and sent to a “drug rehabilitation” facility that changed her world.

To the public, Straight Inc. was a place of recovery. But behind closed doors, the program used bizarre and intimidating methods to “treat” its patients. In her raw and fearless memoir, Cyndy Etler recounts her sixteen months in the living nightmare that Straight Inc. considered “healing.” Read Publisher’s Weekly review here.

Beck, by Mal Peet (with Meg Rosoff). Born of a brief encounter between a Liverpool prostitute and an African soldier in 1907, Beck finds himself orphaned as a young boy and sent overseas to the Catholic Brothers in Canada. At age fifteen he is sent to work on a farm, from which he eventually escapes. Finally in charge of his own destiny, Beck starts westward, crossing the border into America and back, all while the Great Depression rages on. What will it take for Beck to understand the agonies of his childhood and realize that love is possible? Read Publisher’s Weekly starred review here.

P.S. I Like You, by Kasie West. Exchanging notes with a mysterious pen pal by writing them on her Chemistry desk, Lily discovers that her anonymous friend is a boy and realizes that she is falling for him before learning that he is the last person she ever expected to love. Read the TeenReads review here.

The Art of Being Normal, by Lisa Williamson. David Piper, always an outsider, forms an unlikely friendship with Leo Denton who, from the first day at his new school wants only to be invisible, but when David’s deepest secret gets out that he wants to be a girl, things get very messy for both of them. Read The Guardian review here.

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Posted in Adventure, Best-Seller, Biography, Dystopia, Fantasy, Fiction, Historical Fiction, History, Realistic Fiction, Romance, Uncategorized

New Titles for May! Part I

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93209  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93199  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93222  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93230

Crazy Messy Beautiful, by Carrie Arcos. Falling repeatedly in love but unable to succeed in the style of the poet who inspired his name, 16-year-old Neruda Diaz is partnered on a school assignment with a girl unlike anyone he typically falls for and discovers the magic and mess of a romance born from friendship. Read Publisher’s Weekly review here.

Alex & Eliza, by Melissa de la Cruz. “Hamilton” for the YA set. The New York Times best-selling author of The Witches of East End and The Descendants series brings to life the romance between young Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth Schuyler. Read the Historical Novel Society here.

Hillary Rodham Clinton: A Woman Living History, by Karen Blumenthal. The author of Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different presents an accessible, carefully researched portrait of the former first lady, senator and secretary of state that traces her unconventional upbringing, political achievements and devotion to activist causes. Read Publisher’s Weekly starred review here.

Nightstruck (Nightstruck Series, vol. 1), by Jenna Black. Struggling with her parents’ divorce and high expectations while working on her college applications, Becket is tricked into opening a door between worlds and unleashing magical monsters into her Philadelphia community. Read Tor review here.

 

 

Posted in Biography, Dance

Michaela DePrince

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/92327

Michaela DePrince was fortunate enough to escape her home country of war-torn Sierra Leone, West Africa, when she was adopted at the age of four by Elaine and Charles DePrince. Her parents enrolled her in swimming and dance classes, but ever since seeing a picture of a ballerina when she was living at the orphanage, she had wanted to study ballet. She is now, at the young age of 20, an international ballet superstar who has danced with the Dutch National Ballet, the Dance Theatre of Harlem, in Beyoncé’s “Lemonade” music video, and on Broadway.

Michaela’s biography Taking Flight is emblematic of the American can-do spirit. Check out her inspiring story, listen to her talk about her past or watch her beautiful dance style in these videos:

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Posted in Adventure, Biography, Dystopia, Fiction, Historical Fiction, History, Realistic Fiction, Series

More Books for December!

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/91247On August 9, 1945, six-year-old Sachiko, who lived in Nagasaki, Japan, was playing outdoors with four other children. Moments later, those children were all dead. An atomic bomb had exploded half a mile away, destroying everything in its wake. In “Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story,” author Caren Stelson shares the true story – using pictures and text – of a young girl who survived the atomic bomb, and chronicles her long journey to health and peace.

 

y450-293Also in: The first volume in Amy S. Foster’s The Rift Uprising trilogy is a fast-paced action-adventure, where a young soldier comes to question the monsters she’s trained to fight against, and the monsters she fights for.

 

 

 

25982606Finally, in “Burn Baby Burn” by Meg Medina, 17-year-old Nora Lopez lives through a freezing cold winter and a searing hot summer in 1977, when a serial murderer Son of Sam is terrorizing her hometown New York City, and the city seems on the verge to explode.

 

 

Click on the image above or the title below to access the record in our catalog. Books are listed alphabetically by author.

Posted in Biography, Fiction, Humor, Non-Fiction

Fun New Books Just In!

        

Fresh off her gold-medal wins at the Rio 2016 Olympics, gymnast Simone Biles takes you through her gymnastics career in her new autobiography “Courage to Soar,” beginning with her early childhood in foster care, followed by being adopted by her grandparents, and showing off the mad skills that has made her one of the most talented and medaled athletes in history.

The Diary of a Wimpy Kid series continues with “Double Down.” Same with Dork Diaries, with “Tales From a Not-So-Friendly Frenemy.” Another epic read: “The Greatest Zombie Movie Ever,” by Jeff Strand, about budding filmmaker Justin, who sets out to make great cinema, but ends up, well….the clue is in the title.

Dan Howell and Phil Lester, avoiders of human contact and direct sunlight (much like real teens), travel the world bring us this collection of exclusive, funny and intimate photos in their photo diary “Dan & Phil Go Outside.”

Click on the image above or the title below to access the record in our catalog. Books listed in alpha order by author’s last name. Enjoy!!