Posted in Crisis Aid, Depression, Graphic Novels, Minecraft, New, Poetry, Teens

Nonfiction Titles for July

Click on the image or title to access the record in our catalog! Titles below are listed alphabetically by author.

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93890  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93888    http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93923  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93892

Black Butterfly, by Robert M. Drake. Summary: The Black Butterfly is a symbol of transformation and rebirth after death. Drake wrote this book for those who have lost someone in death and in life. This book is a collection of memories and experiences Drake lived after the death of one of his brothers. He promised he would write him a few words after he failed to complete the task while his brother was alive.

Beautiful Chaos, by Robert M. Drake. Summary: This book employs the comparative method to understand societal collapses to which environmental problems contribute to the common youth and society as a whole. In his writing, Robert M. Drake hauntingly describes the issues we are all facing today. We all are broken and broken is its own kind of beautiful.

Grief Recovery for Teens: Letting Go of Painful Emotions With Body-Based Practices, by Coral Popowitz, MSW. Summary: Grief can affect both body and mind—and teens dealing with grief may not know how to work through grief in healthy ways. In this helpful and healing guide, the director of the Children’s Grief Connection offers help for teens dealing with the physical aspects of grief and loss. This book utilizes somatic, body-oriented skills to help teens know how and why their bodies are reacting to grief, as well as ways to relieve anxiety and confusion and begin the healing process.

Building Faith Block by Block, by Michael Ross and Christopher Ross. Summary: Describes how playing Minecraft can provide insight for young Christians into making decisions in real life, and provides devotions that offer advice on both game play and living a Christian life.

Posted in Biography, Graphic Novels, LGBTQ, Manga, Realistic Fiction, Sports, Travel

July: Fiction, Graphic Novels, and an Olympic Soccer Player

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93891  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/94013  https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51I%2BW9eOcML.jpg  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93951  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93998  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93970

Breakaway: Beyond the Goal, by Alex Morgan. Summary: As a talented and successful female athlete, Alex Morgan is a role model to thousands of girls who want to be their best, not just in soccer, but in life. The story of her path to success—from playing in the 2011 Women’s World Cup, to winning gold in the 2012 London Olympics, to ranking as one of the National Team’s top scorers—will inspire everyone who reads it.

From her beginnings with the American Youth Soccer Organization to the role she played in winning the 2015 Women’s World Cup, Alex shares the details that made her who she is today: a fantastic role model and athlete who proudly rocks a pink headband.

The Worry Workbook for Teens: Effective CBT Strategies to Break the Cycle of Chronic Worry & Anxiety, by Jamie A. Micco, PhD. Summary: Teens often worry about school, friends, dating, and what the future holds. But chronic worrying can take a toll both mentally and physically—leading to insomnia, difficulty paying attention, and even headaches and stomachaches. Written by a Harvard faculty member and expert in teen anxiety, this is the first book to target chronic, debilitating worry in teens, and offers effective, easy-to-understand cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) exercises to alleviate worry symptoms and prevent them from escalating into full-blown generalized anxiety disorder.

Wandering Son, vols. 6 & 7, by Shimura Takako. Summary of Series: Shuichi, a boy who wants to be a girl, and Yoshino, a girl who wants to be a boy, become friends in junior high school, where they tackle problems such as gender identity, love, social acceptance, and puberty.

On the Camino, by Jason. Summary: Northwestern Spain, observed with the eye of an artist, chronicling both the good (people, conversations) and the bad (blisters, bedbugs) he encountered on his journey. Full of quiet incidents, odd encounters, small triumphs, and the occasional setback, On the Camino is the first implicitly autobiographical long-form work by a master cartoonist.

The Refrigerator Monologues, by Catherynne M. Valente. Summary: From the New York Times bestselling author Catherynne Valente comes a series of linked stories from the points of view of the wives and girlfriends of superheroes, female heroes, and anyone who’s ever been “refrigerated”: comic book women who are killed, raped, brainwashed, driven mad, disabled, or had their powers taken so that a male superhero’s storyline will progress. In an entirely new and original superhero universe, Valente explores these ideas and themes in the superhero genre, treating them with the same love, gravity, and humor as her fairy tales. After all, superheroes are our new fairy tales and these six women have their own stories to share.

The Unlikelies, by Carrie Firestone. Summary: Rising high school senior Sadie is bracing herself for a long, lonely, and boring summer. But things take an unexpected turn when she steps in to help rescue a baby in distress and a video of her good deed goes viral.

Suddenly internet-famous, Sadie’s summer changes for the better when she’s introduced to other “hometown heroes.” These five very different teens form an unlikely alliance to secretly right local wrongs, but when they try to help a heroin-using friend, they get in over their heads and discover that there might be truth in the saying “no good deed goes unpunished.” Can Sadie and her new friends make it through the summer with their friendships–and anonymity–intact?

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Fiction, Graphic Novels, History, Murder, Mystery, New, Non-Fiction, Realistic Fiction

(More) New Books for May! Part IV

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93214

Check out our newest titles! Click on the book cover or on the title to access the record in our catalog.

Fireworks, by Katie Cotugno. A girl competes with her best friend to become the newest pop star of the late-1990s boy-and-girl band craze, triggering drama and romance along the way. By the best-selling author of 99 Days. Read the Publisher’s Weekly review here.

 

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93224 In the Shadow of Liberty: The Hidden History of Slavery, Four Presidents, and Five Black Lives, by Kenneth C. Davis. Here are the stories of five enslaved people who witnessed the birth of America: Billy Lee, valet to George Washington; Ona Judge, who escaped from Martha Washington; Isaac Granger, servant of Thomas Jefferson; Paul Jennings, who witnessed the War of 1812 in James Madison’s White House; and Alfred Jackson, “owned” by Andrew Jackson. These true stories explore our country’s great, tragic contradiction–that a nation “conceived in liberty” was also born in shackles. In this lavishly designed, fully illustrated edition, these five dramatic narratives, accessibly told and with primary sources where possible, will bust myths and help set the sanitized historical record straight. Read the BookPage review here.

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93237  The Stone Heart (The Nameless City, vol. 2)  by Faith Erin Hicks. Kaidu and Rat have only just recovered from the assassination attempt on the General of All Blades when more chaos breaks loose in the Nameless City: deep conflicts within the Dao nation are making it impossible to find a political solution for the disputed territory of the City itself. To complicate things further, Kaidu is fairly certain he’s stumbled on a formula for the lost weapon of the mysterious founders of the City. . . . But sharing it with the Dao military would be a complete betrayal of his friendship with Rat. Can Kai find the right solution before the Dao find themselves at war? Read the Kids Book Buzz review here.

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/89020The Girls in the Garden, by Lisa Jewell. Deep in the heart of London, in a lush communal square, as a festive garden party is taking place, a thirteen year-old girl lies unconscious and bloody in a hidden corner. What really happened to her? And who is responsible? For fans of Liane Moriarty and Jojo Moyes comes a family drama with a dark mystery at its core. Read the Publisher’s Weekly review here.

 

 

 

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93206 Bang, by Barry Lyga. Sebastian Cody did something horrible, something no one–not even Sebastian himself–can forgive. At the age of four, he accidentally shot and killed his infant sister with his father’s gun.
Now, ten years later, Sebastian has lived with the guilt and horror for his entire life. With his best friend away for the summer, Sebastian has only a new friend–Aneesa–to distract him from his darkest thoughts. But even this relationship cannot blunt the pain of his past. Because Sebastian knows exactly how to rectify his childhood crime and sanctify his past. It took a gun to get him into this. Now he needs a gun to get out. Read the TeenReads review here.

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93239  This Land is Our Land: A History of American Immigration, by Lina Barrett Osborne. This book explores the way government policy and popular responses to immigrant groups evolved throughout U.S. history, particularly between 1800 and 1965. The book concludes with a summary of events up to contemporary times, as immigration again becomes a hot-button issue. Includes an author’s note, bibliography, and index. Read the Publisher’s Weekly review here.

 

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/93216  Gem & Dixie, by Sara Zarr. Gem has never known what it is to have security. She’s never known an adult she can truly rely on. But the one constant in her life has been Dixie. Gem grew up taking care of her sister when no one else could: not their mother, whose issues make it hard for her to keep food on the table, and definitely not their father, whose intermittent presence is the only thing worse than his frequent absence. Even as Gem and Dixie have grown apart, they’ve always had each other. When their dad returns home for the first time in years and tries to insert himself back into their lives, Gem finds herself with an unexpected opportunity: three days with Dixie–on their own in Seattle and beyond. But this short trip soon becomes something more, as Gem discovers that to save herself, she may have to sever the one bond she’s tried so hard to keep. Read the Publisher’s Weekly starred review here.

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Posted in Adventure, Comics, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Series

Grrls Graphic Novels Galore

http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/83099  https://pictures.abebooks.com/isbn/9781608868032-us.jpg https://d4rri9bdfuube.cloudfront.net/assets/images/book/large/9781/6088/9781608869190.jpg  https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/513jHT4QVCL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg  http://evergreen.rodgerslibrary.org/opac/extras/ac/jacket/large/r/91361  https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61pkw2X5%2BbL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg  https://d4rri9bdfuube.cloudfront.net/assets/images/book/large/9780/7851/9780785196198.jpg  https://d1w7fb2mkkr3kw.cloudfront.net/assets/images/book/large/9780/7851/9780785196181.jpg

Four volumes of Lumbarjanes, the quirky graphic novel series featuring a gal gang of four Lumberjane scouts, written and illustrated by an all-female creative team, are now available. Read the Nerdist review here and the MarySue review here.

Paper Girls, created by Brian K. Vaughn, is a nostalgia-filled romp coming-of-age – except it’s not a romp, and the characters who are coming of age are not boys, but girls. Yup. Girl Power. It’s a “Stand By Me” and “War of the Worlds” mash-up. Which is Epic.

My favorite Marvel hero, the Merc with a Mouth, is featured in two “new” (“new” as in: new to the library) Teens collection – “End of an Error” and “Deadpool vs. Sabretooth.” Because you can never have enough Deadpool in your life.

Click on any of the images to access the record in our catalog and to find out more about each volume. Please note: Collections of graphic novels are grouped in one record, and display only the image from the first volume in the series. The availability of each volume is also displayed, and holds can be placed on individual volumes.